Posts Tagged ‘ talks

Presenting ONMjs @ SeaLang on 2013.11.06

I’ll be doing my first public talk on the forthcoming ONMjs library at the Seattle Programming Languages Meetup group on November, 6th 2013 in Redmond, WA. If you’re local, I encourage you to come.

This is a great group and I expect to learn as much as I educate given the caliber of the engineers that turn out monthly for these meetings.

Here’s a link to the event:

[SeaLang] Decoupled Web Apps w/ONMjs

One of our own, Chris Russell, will be presenting the following:

“Join us in November for a talk about architecture, design patterns, and strategies for building decoupled, reactive web applications and components using a new JavaScript library called ONMjs developed by speaker Chris Russell for the open source Encapsule Project.

ONMjs (Object Namespace Manager) is a low-level infrastructure library written in CoffeeScript (compiled to JavaScript) based on a hybrid design pattern called Model Store Observe Feedback Signal (MSOFS) . The library was created to simplify the development of complex client-side HTML 5 data visualization and editing applications but is neither a UI nor strictly client-side library.

Briefly, ONMjs provides you with a way to declare and annotate your application’s data object model (Model concept), an automated way to create and dispose of data objects (Store concept), a set of API’s for writing event handlers (Observer concept), API’s for accessing and mutating data (Feedback concept), and support for communicating data changes among decoupled application subsystems (Signal concept).

The talk will be informal and there will be plenty of time for Q&A and discussion of related topics. You are encouraged to bring your laptop and tip the staff at Canyons Redmond who generously hosts SeaLang’s monthly meetings.”

As always, we’ll have a few OReilly books to bribe away, and as a reminder, your host (Ted Neward) won’t be there. If somebody wants to step up to be the host (meaning, you get there a few minutes early, mention to the staff that we’re taking over the back, remember to bring a VGA cable so Chris can hook his laptop up to the TV, and open the meeting with whatever schtick sounds good to you before introducing Chris), email me and I’ll send you a list of things to do that mirrors exactly that list I just rattled off. ;-)

Thanks to Ted Neward and SeaLang for the opportunity to come speak.

May 30th, 2013 Talk at Seattle Graph Database Meetup

Graph Database Seattle

Graph Database Seattle

I’ll be doing a talk about the Encapsule Project and the Schema HTML 5 application at the Seattle Graph Database Meetup group on Thursday, May 30th, 2013 in Seattle.

Event link: http://seattle.meetup.neo4j.org/events/117587312/

Disney’s 10th Floor World & Land, 925 4th Ave N Seattle,98104, Seattle, WA (map)

Thanks to Saikat Kanjilal and the other organizers of Graph Database Seattle for organizing these meetups and agreeing to let me speak!

Schema v0.869 Screenshot

I am currently working on something I call the “navigator” – essentially a Javascript library (compiled from Coffeescript actually)  that accepts as input a Javascript “layout” object declaration.

demo: stable demo link • latest development build

The layout is parsed to create a “tree-view” type thing. However, this isn’t an ordinary tree-view control. Not even close. The ‘navigator’ library allows each node in the tree to be annotated with additional metadata that conveys to the navigator that the menu item should semantically model a concept. “Concepts” are whatever you can declare and insert into the metadata.

The “concept” I’m interested in at the moment is modeling the structure of the SCDL data object model on top of JSON with enough precision to generate the runtime code I need to edit and manage the data objects in my model at the semantic level of SCDL, not JSON.

Starting with the simplest of Javascript objects that defines the menu names in a treeview, I’ve applied the idea of annotating each menu item with additional metadata fed into a set of object factories to allow menu items to be “conceptually bound” to nodes in a JSON object described in metadata.

A tree-view with a single root can be thought of as the root object of a JSON deserialization. Similarly, the children of the root can be thought of as sub-objects, or sub-arrays. Each menu item is annotated in metadata to set it’s associated JSON object type. Additionally, information in the metadata is parsed to determine SCDL-level schema (higher-order than JSON).

The screenshot below is of build 0.869 with the “Advanced” view selected.

Encapsule Project Schema 0.869 (test build)

Encapsule Project Schema 0.869 (test build)

It’s not time-efficient to explain further right now but the level of power the ‘navigator’ gives me is incredible… Navigator allows me to map pretty much any object model to JSON (doesn’t have to be SCDL). You can declare “navigator layout” objects (Javascript objects) for different problem domains (i.e. completely unrelated sets of objects that comprise some sort of “domain specific modeling schema”) and use them in the same application in different instances of navigator. Or, bind a single layout to multiple object models…

v1 Schema will very likely rely very heavily on ‘navigator’ as the core of the application.

Upcoming SCDL Talks and Schema Demos

I’ll be giving an extremely short talk and demo of the forthcoming Schema design tool at LinuxFest Northwest 2013 (April 27th and 28th in Bellingham, WA) as part of their “lightning round” presentations. [1]

Tentatively, I’ll be giving a longer demo/talk to the Graph Database Seattle group sometime in May (time and exact location in Seattle hasn’t been set for this meeting yet).

Additionally, I’ll be doing a full demo and giving an extended talk about Soft Circuit Description Language (SCDL) at the monthly meeting of the Seattle Programming Languages (SeaLang) group on June, 5th in Redmond, WA.

I’ll post more details as I get them.

Back to code… I’ve got lots of work yet to complete to avoid looking like an idiot :-)

[1] If you live in the Seattle-area LinuxFest should not be missed. The talks are great, the people are interesting and friendly, and of course it’s free.